To Evening (1803): A Sunday Italian poem

Italy from Space

Ugo Foscolo, an Italian patriot, pre-Romantic and atheist, died in exile in London.  After the Risorgimento his remains were returned to Florence.  His poem To Evening (Alla Serra) captures his restlessness, his longing for the peace that evening brings to the world, whilst foreshadowing his eventual death that will soothe his pains away.

Perhaps because you are the image
of the fatal quiet, your coming is so dear to me,
O evening!  And whether gay summer clouds
and serene zephyrs court you
Or whether down from the snowy air
you bring long, restless nights to the world,
Always you descend invoked.
and you softly take hold of the secret paths of my heart

You cause me to wander with my thoughts upon the traces
That lead to eternal nothingness; and meanwhile
this evil time flies, and with it goes the swarms
Of cares with which it is destroying itself and me;
And the while I gaze upon your peacefulness
that warrior spirit which roars in me is sleeping.

Photograph of the Mezzogiorno partly under cloud, with lightning over Naples, by the US Astronaut Scott Kelly who is spending a year in space in the International Space Station.

 

Advertisements

One thought on “To Evening (1803): A Sunday Italian poem

  1. Beautiful. I did not know about him. I studied Italian patriots. Many came to New York. One invented the telephone- Antonio Meucci. He got it working and everything. Congress apologized, I think in the ’90s. I did a paper on it for University. He never went back.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s