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‘Paradise doesn’t exist’!

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This well-executed, politically-minded graffiti made me smile when I snapped it on Saturday in a back alley near the Museo Diocesano in the Centro Storico in Naples.  The skeletal figures are taken from the workers on strike in the famous painting Il Quarto Stato – The Fourth Estate (1901) by Giuseppe Pellizza da Volpedo which is in the Museo del Novecento, Milan.

More on Naples graffiti, love it or loath it, here.  There is even a Napoli Street Art Twitter feed you can follow here.

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Naples: Utterly chaotic and with a hint of danger

Naples via Daily Mail

‘If you have a hankering for somewhere ancient and aromatic, shadowy and mysterious, laden with centuries of history, somewhere not yet quite 20th century, let alone 21st, then Naples is the place for you: colourful markets, anarchic traffic, washing hanging out on balconies next to gorgeous, crumbling baroque churches — and humanity, in all its noisy, squabbling vigour, living its life out in the cobbled streets and the piazzas’.

The Daily Mail’s writer liked Naples in all its gritty glory.  So do we.  More about Naples here.  Naples graffito featured image from WordPress Blogger The Daily Norm.

Vandalism As Literature

The Dish

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Emily Gowers is captivated by Kristina Milnor’s Graffiti and the Literary Landscape in Roman Pompeii:

Milnor reads the graffiti as carefully as any literary text, picking out clever manipulations of lines from Ovid and Virgil and the rhymes hidden in abbreviations that speak of subtle play on the aural and read experience of words. She also takes account of the original location of graffiti, which was often placed so as to initiate a dialogue with adjacent visual images. Along with crudity, she finds delicate sequences of erotic poems and even – wishful thinking, perhaps – Rome’s only personal declaration of lesbian desire. Her project fits well with other recent explorations of the fuzzy areas at the margins of canonical Latin literature: paratexts, pseudepigrapha (fakes ascribed to famous authors) and centos. In her view, one reason graffiti should intrigue us is because it shows how permeable the borders were between elite…

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Exposure and Other Worldly Morsels: L’arte di strada di Napoli

Exposure and Other Worldly Morsels

“Bus stops are far more interesting and useful places to have art than in museums. Graffiti has more chance of meaning something or changing stuff than anything indoors. Graffiti has been used to start revolutions, stop wars, and generally is the voice of people who aren’t listened to. Graffiti is one of those few tools you have if you have almost nothing. And even if you don’t come up with a picture to cure world poverty you can make somebody smile while they’re having a piss”
 – Banksy, Banging Your Head Against a Brick Wall

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